This JavaScript enables OnlineOpinion, a method for collecting secure feedback data.
Go InternationalMore Information
Contact Us
Chris Chen
CTP, AAP
PNC Shanghai Representative Office
86-21 6335 0268
chris.chen@pnc.com
Feedback
Replay Video
Replay Video

Want to learn more? Check out the following content.

Liberalization of Chinese Currency

China has experienced strong growth since the economic reforms that took place in the 1980s. China today is now not only the largest exporter of manufactured goods, it is also the second largest economy in the world.

« Return to Feature


Liberalization of Chinese Currency

Go International: Additional Features
  • What the liberalization of Chinese currency means to your business

    Learn More »

    China has experienced strong growth since the economic reforms that took place in the 1980s. China today is now not only the largest exporter of manufactured goods, it is also the second largest economy in the world.

  • How to protect earnings from foreign exchange swings

    Learn More »

    The recent spike in foreign currency volatility has taken a big bite out of earnings from both a transaction and translation perspective. This presentation will help explain these issues and explore strategies for mitigating the currency impact on earnings and cash flow.

  • You may be able to save money by doing business in foreign currency.

    Learn More »

    Over the past two decades, the U.S. economy has become increasingly linked to global markets, both for sourcing and sales. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Census and Economic Information Center, in 1995, trade amounted to 22 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product.

  • Importing and exporting responsibilities in a complex global marketplace

    Learn More »

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (December 2014), from 2000 to 2013 (the last full year for which statistics are available), exports have grown from $1,075,321 in seasonally adjusted millions of dollars to $1,592,784, while imports have grown from $1,447,837 to $2,756,586 in the same period.

  • Benefitting from the liberalization of Chinese currency

    Learn More »

    Over the past decade, U.S. trade with China grew more than 3 ½ times faster than total U.S. foreign trade. If you are one of the growing number of companies doing business in China, recent moves to liberalize its currency can have substantial bottom-line benefits for you.

  • Investing in the global marketplace

    Learn More »

    Now more than ever, international equity plays a critical role in a well-balanced portfolio. International stocks represent a large and growing share of the global investment universe, and international stocks offer investors the potential to capitalize on faster long-term growth trends abroad.

  • Gaining control and flexibility in your international cash flow

    Learn More »

    Companies of all sizes are increasingly looking for growth beyond borders. In order to succeed in the international marketplace, you need control and flexibility in your cash flow.

  • Managing currency risk with foreign exchange options

    Learn More »

    Some currencies have been locked in extended periods of rangebound trading while others have experienced significant one -directional moves. Options can deliver protection and an opportunity to gain back what may have been lost in an adverse move. 

  • Choosing a financial institution to support expansion in Canada

    Learn More »

    Canada is a vital market for U.S. companies. The United States sells more goods to Canada than to all 27 countries of the European Union combined.

  • Vibrant emerging markets in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa

    Learn More »

    More and more U.S. companies are engaging with vibrant emerging markets, such as those represented by the so-called BRICS -- Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. Manufacturing capacity, raw materials, labor and even technology make these markets attractive destinations for international expansion. However, doing business with the BRICS can be a challenge.

  • Learn more about our largest trading partner.

    Learn More »

    The ease and longevity of our relationship with Canada can make us forget that the enormous territory to the north is not just an extension of the United States. Like any other global market, Canada has its own customs, laws, rules, and regulations that require just as much attention and insight as those of our more distant trading partners. 

  • How will you succeed in the international marketplace?

    Learn More »

    Companies of all sizes are increasingly looking for growth beyond borders. In order to succeed in the international marketplace, you need control and flexibility in your cash flow. That means clear visibility into your accounts as well as cash management and liquidity structures that maximize access to funds and liquidity solutions in different local and regional markets and in multiple currencies.

  • How well are you positioned for international growth?

    Learn More »

    In 2012, the United States once again set a record for exports with a volume of goods and services totaling $1.55 trillion, up by roughly $66 billion from 2011. Legislation focused on improving trade advocacy and export promotion efforts, increasing access to credit and removing barriers to the sale of U.S. goods and services abroad is intended to double exports by 2014.

  • BRICS: Currency risks and mitigation tactics

    Learn More »

    More and more U.S. companies are engaging with vibrant emerging markets, such as those represented by the so-called BRICS -- Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. Manufacturing capacity, raw materials, labor and even technology make these markets attractive destinations for international expansion. However, doing business with the BRICS can be a challenge for companies accustomed to the certainties of mainstream currencies

  • Managing currency risks with international transactions

    Learn More »

    Companies buying, selling or capitalizing a foreign business often overlook potential and ongoing currency risks including currency impacts on valuation, financial statements, and capitalization.

    This webinar will provide specific, actionable information on currency risk management, including: pre-close exposure/hedging, managing the currency impact of capitalization decisions, financial statement impact and more.

  • Improving your foreign exchange policies and practices

    Learn More »

    As companies increase engagement with international trading partners and markets remain unpredictable, they must develop and adopt effective foreign exchange risk strategies. This webinar will cover why you need an FX policy, elements of an effective policy, forecasting, budgeting and planning and considerations for the period between trade execution and maturity.

  • China: Finding opportunity in recent changes

    Learn More »

    China is the world’s second-largest economy and continues to have very bright growth prospects. Yet doing business there can be highly challenging.  This webinar will provide insight into recent changes in the Chinese financial climate and the potential impact of China’s new currency liberalization policy on your prospects for success.

  • Advantages of doing business in the local Chinese currency

    Learn More »

    If you are doing business in China, the recent liberalization of its currency can have substantial benefits for you. It’s easier to make and receive payments and there are more tools for managing currency risk.

  • A rational approach to improving your hedging policy

    Learn More »

    Humans have an amazing capacity for reasoning, memory, action, feelings and emotions. But capacity alone does not ensure that we will develop the proper biases to employ every day in predictive scenarios. In some cases, these biases come hardwired in our brains and work against us when it comes to predicting market movements. This is where Behavioral Finance, the study of how humans interact with markets, can provide some insight.

  • Fundamental Accounting Concepts for FX Hedging

    Learn More »

    Volatility in the equity markets has become commonplace. Likewise, in many cases related to and at times causing these moves, global currency markets have also been experiencing larger than normal swings. Fortunately for those companies with international business, foreign exchange hedging products such as forwards and options are available to protect against the potentially adverse impact of currency fluctuations.

  • It's important to have a grasp on what the dollar will be worth in the long term.

    Learn More »

    "Today the U.S. dollar is a “fiat” currency and is not supported by any physical asset. Put another way, the U.S. dollar represents value simply based on the confidence in the United States government and the United States economy. It is the full trust and belief in the power, trustworthiness, and reliability of the United States."

  • Chinese renminbi internationalization

    Learn More »

    China’s dramatic growth in international trade has made it the second largest economy in the world, as well as the largest exporter. However, the use of China’s currency, the renminbi (RMB), has not grown as extensively as the economic boom. China’s currency has been subject to extensive exchange controls, which has resulted in the U.S. dollar (USD) being used for the majority of cross-border transactions

  • The degree and pace of change in currency is the best way to cope?

    Learn More »
  • International banking services

    Learn More »

    The rewards of doing business internationally have never been greater. And it’s never been more important for businesses of all sizes to understand how to take advantage of the opportunities and mitigate the risks presented by global commerce. Here are some winning strategies to help you participate in the growth of international trade.

  • The United States is a major export player with enormous untapped potential.

    Learn More »

    In spite of the impression that US exports are not competitive, are shrinking or hamstrung by protectionism, the US remains a major player, with enormous untapped potential.  The U.S. remains the third largest exporter of goods in the world. And when you add in services, the picture gets even better. Still, many companies are reluctant to explore the international market, even though 95% of the world’s consumers are beyond our borders.

  • International payments and risk mitigation

    Learn More »

    Do you know the safest ways to get paid for an international sale? The U.S. Commercial Service & PNC Bank help with our "Making Exporting Easier" web-based seminar that outlines the common international methods of payment used in global trade and risk mitigation tools.

  • Tailoring rolling FX hedges

    Learn More »

    Rolling FX Hedges can be tailored to match your company's cash flow needs and adjust for risk, enabling your company to compete in a changing business environment.  Garry Duncan, Managing Director in PNC's Foreign Exchange Group, outlines how these can be a viable option.

  • Business considerations in Canada and Mexico

    Learn More »

    US, Canada and Mexico represent the world's largest free trade area, created in 1994 through the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). NAFTA has opened up unprecedented opportunities for companies throughout the US. In this webinar, we explore what businesses need to know to enhance their success in Canada and Mexico.

  • International treasury management 

    Learn More »

    Canada and Mexico provide tremendous business opportunities for U.S. companies that want to grow.  However, there are still some unique challenges that need to be addressed. George Hoffman, Senior Vice President of PNC's Global Treasury Management Group, reviews some of the differences in banking services, regulations and market risks that could affect your bottom line.



The materials or video that you are going to view were prepared for general information purposes only and are not intended as legal, tax or accounting advice or as recommendations to engage in any specific transaction, including with respect to any securities of PNC, and do not purport to be comprehensive. Under no circumstances should any information contained in those materials or video be used or considered as an offer or commitment, or a solicitation of an offer or commitment to participate in any particular transaction or strategy. Any reliance upon any such information is solely and exclusively at your own risk. Please consult your own counsel, accountant or other advisor regarding your specific situation. Any opinions expressed in those materials or videos are subject to change without notice.

PNC is a registered mark of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. ("PNC")
©2015 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

General Disclosure

Site Map